vendredi 30 janvier 2015

Latent HIV may lurk in 'quiet' immune cells, research suggests

HIV can lie dormant in infected cells for years, even decades. Scientists think unlocking the secrets of this viral reservoir may make it possible to cure, not just treat, HIV. Researchers have gained new insight on which immune cells likely do, and do not, harbor this latent virus.

Latent HIV may lurk in 'quiet' immune cells, research suggests

Stress shared by same-sex couples can have unique health impacts

Minority stress -- which results from being stigmatized and disadvantaged in society -- affects same-sex couples' stress levels and overall health, research indicates. Authors of a new study state that the health effects of minority stress shared by a couple can be understood as distinct from individual stress, a new framework in the field.

Stress shared by same-sex couples can have unique health impacts

Research uncovers connection between Craigslist personals, HIV trends

Craigslist's entry into a market results in a 15.9 percent increase in reported HIV cases, according to research. When mapped at the national level, more than 6,000 HIV cases annually and treatment costs estimated between $62 million and $65.3 million can be linked to the popular website, the authors state.

Research uncovers connection between Craigslist personals, HIV trends

Study links deficiency of cellular housekeeping gene with aggressive forms of breast cancer

A strong link between the most aggressive type of breast cancer and a gene that regulates the body's natural cellular recycling process, called autophagy, has been uncovered by researchers.

Study links deficiency of cellular housekeeping gene with aggressive forms of breast cancer

Fluorescent dyes 'light up' brain cancer cells

Two new fluorescent dyes attracted to cancer cells may help neurosurgeons more accurately localize and completely resect brain tumors, suggests a new study. Removing all visible areas of cancer (gross total resection) significantly improves survival after brain cancer surgery.

Fluorescent dyes 'light up' brain cancer cells

'Vast Majority' of Neurosurgeons Practice Defensive Medicine

More than three-fourths of US neurosurgeons practice some form of defensive medicine--performing additional tests and procedures out of fear of malpractice lawsuits, new research reports.

'Vast Majority' of Neurosurgeons Practice Defensive Medicine

DNA nanoswitches reveal how life's molecules connect

'Bio-molecular interaction analysis, a cornerstone of biomedical research, is traditionally accomplished using equipment that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars,' said the senior author of a new study. 'Rather than develop a new instrument, we've created a nanoscale tool made from strands of DNA that can detect and report how molecules behave, enabling biological measurements to be made by almost anyone, using only common and inexpensive laboratory reagents.'

DNA nanoswitches reveal how life's molecules connect

Ethicists question impact of hospital advertising

Ethicists question the impact of health information that is available online, specifically hospital advertisements, and argue that while the Internet offers patients valuable data and tools -- including hospital quality ratings and professional treatment guidelines - that may help them when facing decisions about where to seek care or whether to undergo a medical procedure, reliable and unbiased information may be hard to identify among the growing number of medical care advertisements online.

Ethicists question impact of hospital advertising

Older adults: Double your protein to build more muscle

Older adults may need to double up on the recommended daily allowance of protein to efficiently maintain and build muscle. Current US recommendations for daily dietary protein intake are 0.8 grams/kilogram of body weight (roughly 62 g of protein per day for a 170-pound person).

Older adults: Double your protein to build more muscle